Legacy Specs

To see an overview of PSIA specifications click here.
To see an overview of PSIA White Papers and Presentations, click here.

Systems Protocol Specifications

PSIA Common Security Model v2.0 R1 (posted 4/18/2015)

The PSIA Common Security Model (CSEC) specification is the comprehensive PSIA specification for all protocol, data and user security. It covers security requirements and definitions for network and session security, key and certificate management, and user permission management. These security definitions apply to all PSIA nodes.

Service Model v3.0

PSIA Common Metadata & Event Model v3.1 Rev 0.4 (posted 05/12/16)

Domain Protocol Specifications

IP Media Device Spec (IPMD)1.1 Spec Pack

This package contains the specifications relevant to all PSIA members and registrees as of Feb 2010. While the contents of this package are available as separate documents, it is expected at this time that all parties interested in the PSIA IP Media Device Specification will also require the PSIA Service Model. Both of these specifications are included in this package for convenience

Recording and Content Management (RaCM) Specification, Version 1.1a (r0.6b)

The PSIA Recording and Content Management (RaCM) Specification, Version 1.1a, describes the PSIA standards for recording, managing, searching, describing, and streaming multimedia information over IP networks. This includes support for both NVRs and DVRs. The specification references the PSIA Service Model and IP Media Device specifications. XML Schema definitions, and XML examples, are included in the specification to aid implementers in developing standards-based products. The specification was developed with input from a broad set of manufacturers.

RaCM Specification Overview

Backgrounder: The PSIA Recording and Content Management Specification

The Benefits

  • The PSIA Recording and Content Management (RaCM) specification, combined with the PSIA IP Media Device spec, enables Digital Video Recorders (DVRs), Network Video Recorders (NVRs) and Video Management Systems (VMS) from different manufacturers to easily interoperate with each other and to control the different devices (e.g., cameras and encoders) in a video surveillance network.
  • The PSIA RaCM specification gives DVRs, NVRs and VMS a common language; the PSIA IP Media Device specification does the same for IP-based surveillance cameras and encoders. When all these devices can “speak” to each other, video data recorded by one or more vendors’ cameras can be saved to NVRs from one or more company, and can be viewed and managed by yet another vendor’s VMS or a physical security information management system (PSIM). The VMS and PSIM systems can also control cameras at the network’s edges.
  • The PSIA RaCM spec standardizes how systems tag video data, such as a motion-triggered event, making it easier for security users to quickly search and retrieve data. Through the RaCM specification, an alarm or event in one system can be automatically communicated to and trigger actions in other systems, increasing the value of surveillance networks.
  • The specifications enables integrators and end users to focus on selecting the best cameras, recorders and management systems without spending money and time writing software interfaces to ensure these devices will communicate. Devices compliant with the PSIA IP Media Device and RaCM specs are designed to work together “out of the box.”
  • Manufacturers can focus on product features and functions instead of communications and interoperability issues because these have been solved by the PSIA’s RaCM and IP Media Device specs.  Today, VMS and camera vendors put intense resources into solving these challenges.

Practical Application: Gaining Interoperability Across a Video Surveillance Network

Most video surveillance networks include a mix of IP cameras and legacy analog cameras, encoders and recorders from many different manufacturers. Very large networks may even have more than one VMS controlling different network segments. In most cases, application programming interfaces (APIs) or custom code is necessary to enable IP cameras at the edge of the network to interact with an NVR or VMS. APIs are generally unique for each camera vendor; code may be required for a specialized camera not supported by the VMS.  Each time camera firmware is upgraded, APIs and custom interfaces may also need to be updated.

All of these connections are standardized and streamlined in a video surveillance network compliant with the PSIA’s IP Media Device and RaCM specifications. The equipment becomes plug-and-play compatible, enabling security users to focus on functionality, not interfaces.

For example, users can enable a “motion detected” event captured by a camera and NVR in one segment of the network to be an event trigger in a VMS and/or PSIM system, even though all the devices and systems come from different manufacturers.  Security users could then directly control the camera from the VMS.

Practical Application: Video/Multimedia Content Management

IP video cameras can generate vast quantities of image data, yet usually only a few seconds or minutes of footage are needed to trigger alerts in other systems or to aid in a forensic investigation. Searching the data from one camera is already a significant challenge; during a security event, users may also need to quickly locate and review data from additional devices from different vendors.

The PSIA RaCM spec simplifies and speeds up searches like these because it standardizes how video devices describe or “tag” events and provides a common language for recording, managing, searching and retrieving video/multimedia data. Knowing how all video events are tagged enables end users to quickly filter out irrelevant data.

Users can combine these capabilities with other PSIA-compliant systems to gain still more utility from surveillance networks. Because all PSIA-compliant systems understand “events” in a common language, events captured by cameras can be used to create triggers in other systems, including access control. So motion at a door could close a lock, launch a second camera view, collect data from a sensor, etc.

Specification Basics

  • The PSIA specifications make plug-and-play interoperability possible for systems, applications and devices across and beyond the security ecosystem. All PSIA-compliant systems and devices, from cameras to physical security information management systems, have a common way to describe alarms, events, actions, etc.
  • Because all the systems “express” themselves in a common way, it’s easy for the integrator or end user to set up “if-then” triggers in the rules engines usually built into security systems and applications.

Download PDF

Video Analytics Specification (VAS) v1.0

The v1.0 Video Analytics Specification specifies an interface that enables IP devices and video management/surveillance systems to communicate video analytics data in a standardized way. The scope for the initial release of the Specification focuses entirely on video analytics capabilities discovery and analytic data output.  Video analytic capabilities discovery will include standard configuration data exchange to enable any analytic device to communicate to another device or application its basic analytic capabilities at the device level and the video channel level (for multi-channel devices).  This includes information such as the PSIA VAS version number supported, analytic vendor information (name, software version number, etc.), event types and mechanisms supported, and other supported configurations. From an analytic output perspective, the v1.0 Specification includes the definition of multiple types of analytic events, including alerts and counts, as well as video analytics metadata output.

Video Analytics Specification Overview

Backgrounder: The PSIA Video Analytics Specification

The Benefits

  • The PSIA Video Analytics specification enables systems integrators and end users to easily integrate data from video analytics software with multiple video management and security systems and other applications from a variety of vendors. Video analytics packages may be deployed not just for security reasons but also to supply data to marketing and business intelligence applications.
  • The Video Analytics specification enables integrators and end users to focus on how systems will use analytics data. They no longer need to spend expensive resources writing software interfaces to communicate data among different analytics engines and a variety of video management, access control and physical security information management systems.

  • Security operators see one unified view of analytics intelligence even when several different brands of analytics packages are used, as long as all have incorporated the PSIA Video Analytics specification.
  • Through the Video Analytics specification, an alarm or event in one system can automatically trigger actions in other systems, increasing the value of analytics programs.

Practical Application: Integrating various video analytics programs with the PSIA Video Analytics Spec

In a large security installation, different brands of analytics software may be deployed for specific tasks, such as Brand A in cameras covering fences and Brand B watching traffic flow. Typically, data from the various analytics-equipped video streams is displayed on several different monitors, and these may also be separate from video management and access control monitors. During a security event, personnel may have to watch several monitors, which can be overwhelming.

When the analytics software all complies with the PSIA Video Analytics spec, the data, even if created by different brands, can all appear on a single monitor. Further, if the installation’s video, access and intrusion systems comply with the PSIA Area Control spec, those systems may also share data along with the analytics. Then security professionals have a truly singular view of activities and ability to manage them from a single point.

Practical Application: Using the PSIA Video Analytics Specification to integrate analytics with non-security systems

Video analytics programs can provide marketing and business intelligence, such as what are the busiest hours for a specific store entrance, which checkout areas are underutilized, what floor sale displays are effective. In many environments, integrating this data from an analytics program with one or more enterprise business applications requires custom coding and continued maintenance.

Analytics programs incorporating the PSIA Video Analytics specification all “express” themselves in a common way. One common set of analytics definitions, versus a variety of proprietary expressions requiring custom interfaces, makes it easier for users to incorporate analytics data into business applications.

Spec Basics

  • The PSIA specifications make plug-and-play interoperability possible for systems, applications and devices across and beyond the security ecosystem. All PSIA-compliant systems and devices, from cameras to physical security information management systems, have a common way to describe alarms, events, actions, etc.
  • Because all the systems express themselves in a common way, it’s easy for the integrator or end user to set up “if-then” triggers in the rules engines usually built into security systems and other applications.

Download PDF

PSIA Area Control Specification including PLAI- V3.1 (released 8/07/2019)

PLAI Overview

This specification will standardize the communication into access control and intrusion products, making them interoperable with the overall security system.  This spec takes advantage of other PSIA specs, especially the Common Metadata and Events Model (CMEM).   Harmonizing and sharing data between access control, intrusion, video, and analytics systems results in optimized and more easily integrated security management. This update includes PLAI additions.

Area Control Specification Overview

Backgrounder: The PSIA Area Control Specification

The Benefits

  • The PSIA Area Control Specification enables systems integrators and end users to easily integrate multiple access control and intrusion detection systems and devices from different vendors.  The multiple-system, multiple-vendor situation is commonly found in many businesses and facilities.
  • Instead of viewing each system separately, security users can manage and respond to one view of all their access control and intrusion systems and devices once these are integrated via the Area Control spec.
  • Through the Area Control integration, an alarm or event in one system can be automatically communicated to and trigger actions in other systems. This seamless communication streamlines security management and tasks, such as revoking access privileges and clearing alarms.
  • Systems integration that would normally take weeks or months and substantial custom computer code and interfaces can now be accomplished in hours and days–and yet deliver more effective, easily maintained security solutions at lower costs.

Practical Application: Access Revocation

In many security environments today, revoking employee access because of termination or a lost card requires manual intervention in each system. An integrator may write custom code, or a script, to automate the process across the systems, but then the script must be maintained, plus updated and tested each time an underlying system is upgraded or altered.

With access and intrusion systems conforming to the PSIA Area Control specification, security professionals need only enter the revocation command once; it will then propagate automatically to the other systems. Access privileges across a corporate or campus network are cancelled within minutes, with minimal effort, greatly improving security.

Practical Application: PSIA Video Analytics Spec Integration with Area Control Spec

Analytics software within a surveillance camera determines a car is traveling in a restricted area. In most security installations, this information would be revealed in the video or access control system; however, the event might unfold across several different systems, making situation management more difficult.

When the analytics software is compliant with the PSIA Video Analytics spec and the video, access and intrusion systems comply with the Area Control spec, all of these systems can communicate easily with each other. The analytics communicate the car is unauthorized, triggering the access control or intrusion system to initiate a physical barrier to stop the vehicle.

Specification Basics

  • The PSIA specifications make plug-and-play interoperability possible for systems, applications and devices across and beyond the security ecosystem. All PSIA-compliant systems and devices, from cameras to physical security information management systems, have a common way to describe alarms, events, actions, etc.
  • Because all the systems “express” themselves in a common way, it’s easy for the integrator or end user to set up “if-then” triggers in the rules engines usually built into security systems.

Download PDF

Contact us

Address

65 Washington Street, Suite 170
Santa Clara, CA 95050

Email

info@psialliance.org

Phone

1.650-938-6945

Get in touch